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FIVE QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR TECHNO NECK

WHAT IS DIGITAL AGING? WHY IS IT HAPPENING AND HOW TO STOP IT? 
ANOTHER TWO QUESTIONS – PERSONALLY ADDRESSED TO YOU. HOW MANY TIMES A DAY DO YOU TAKE A MOBILE PHONE? FOR HOW MANY YEARS YOU LITERALLY LIVE WITH IT?

 

 

That is how long you ‘frame’ your neck. Literally. If your head stays in the position of a frozen camel for a long time (we usually look at the screen (150-200 times a day) in this position) the superficial muscle of the neck starts to delaminate. Because of its gradual atrophy, transverse wrinkles appear and “Venus rings” are deepening. Such a phenomenon has a term – techno neck.

 WHAT IS GOING ON WITH YOUR NECK WHEN YOU ‘HEAD OVER HEELS’ IN YOUR TELEPHONE.

 The weight of an adult’s head is about 5 kg. If you constantly lean over the smartphone during the day, the load on the cervical spine increases. With a slight head tilt of 15° (reading the message), the spine suffers from unexpected 12 kg. With a tilt of 30 °, the weight automatically switches to 18 kg, at 45 ° – 22 kg, and at 60 ° (posting a new post on Instagram or write a letter) load increases up to 27 kg.
Any trainer in the gym would envy for such a systematic approach to burdening exercise. Seriously speaking, it all can continue with a gradual displacement of the intervertebral discs, the occurrence of pain, and end up with early wear of the cervical spine and a huge impact to the image (as the posture is its true basis).
Superficial muscle of the neck is just slightly exceeding two sheets of paper in its thickness, and restoring its tone is not quite simple.
However, noticeable sagging skin of the neck is not the only nomophobs’ price for being in touch 24/7 (Nomophobia = no-mobile-phone phobia [1]) – fear (phobia) of being left without a mobile phone).

 HOW TO FIGHT PHONE ADDICTION?

First of all, you are not alone. Help is already coming.
Justin Rosenstein, who invented the Facebook ‘Like’ button, admitted in The Guardian interview, that he already blocked Snapchat and Reddit on his smartphone, set a limit on visiting Facebook and set up parental control which prohibits the installation of new applications.
Tristan Harris, dubbed “the conscience of Silicon Valley”, left Google and founded the non-profit organization Time Well Spent. Now he is promoting a digital diet.
The EU-PUI team of the European Committee includes 123 scientists from 38 countries. Neuroscientists and genetics have already put forward a manifesto with a list of methods to fight ‘the pocket enemy’. Now they are developing biomarkers to determine the threat of digital dependence.
In the meantime, Atpoint suggests you to make seven simple steps to improve the posture, avoid the development of degenerative changes in the neck and afford pleasant leisure.

1

Set a time limit. Limit the frequency of use of your smartphone. Develop the habit of taking a three-minute break for every 15-20 minutes of using your device. Change your posture and move.

2

Set automatic reminders. For example, RescueTime, Menthal, Moment, Self-Control, Track-Time.

3

Use a tablet holder. Buy a special bar to lift the tablet to eye level.

4

 

Buy a new chair with a comfortable headrest – you will be too lazy to get off it, your neck will thank you.

 

5

 

Practice regular “digital detox”: net time without gadgets. At least 8 hours once a week.

6

Turn off audio messages and updates. This will allow you not to look into the smartphone when you do not plan to, and besides, clean up all extra stuff from it.

 

7

 

Free some areas of your home from gadgets (bedroom, kitchen, bathroom) with a strong-willed decision, loud voice or large handwriting,

 

WHY SHOULD YOU KEEP A SMARTPHONE OUT OF THE BEDROOM?

 

The blue light from the phone screen before bedtime works in two stages: first, the melatonin level decreases, by about 23%. Melatonin penetrates into all organs and tissues, and can activate the protection of cells against oxidative damage powerfully (these processes are the main cause of wilting and aging of the skin). So it should be protected. A little bit more than a smartphone.

photo: pixabay